Westport   ›   Martin H Klein

Martin H Klein, PhD
Psychologist

Martin H Klein, PhD, Psychologistin Westport, CT

About

Insight-Orient Couples Therapy

Everything that irritates us about others can lead us to an understanding of ourselves.
Carl Jung


Couples therapy is more complex than individual psychotherapy. In individual therapy you are working with one person. In couples therapy you are dealing with a minimum of two. Not only are there twice as many people in the room, but each individual brings his or her own set of psychological issues to the relationship. These psychological issues are not static, but rather are dynamic and intertwine between the couple in a myriad of complex configurations and interpersonal entanglements.

Relationships can take on an ominous life of its own. When left unmanaged, it can throw couples into a whirlwind of interpersonal conflict and distress. Many couples become overcome by the negative patterns of their relationship. They feel beaten down and hopeless — victimized by how the dynamics of the relationship brings out the worst in each other. It is difficult to grasp how two individuals who at one point in time were in love now feel only contempt toward each other. How attraction can transform into repulsion so quickly is beyond all that seems rational.

What complicates couples therapy even more is how each person in the relationships carries within him or herself a vast array of influential voices that have been incorporated into their own sense of self. These voices shapes the ways each partner interacts with the other. Voices from the past, present and even future can be heard within the couple’s narrative — learned beliefs, views, even politics of parents, grandparents, siblings, children, previous relationships, colleagues or friends. In some ways couples counseling is more like group therapy than individual counseling.

To be successful, the psychologist must listen, comprehend, and map out all that is being said within, outside and between the two partners. It is the psychologist’s job to start the initial couples counseling sessions with a comprehensive psychosocial assessment. This is necessary in order to learn all that is being said and not said by each participant, who is being influenced by who, and how all these different voices interact and affect the dynamics of the relationship.

Couples counseling can sometimes feel like a tennis match. Couples arguing back and forth, volleying for their point of view. A therapist, however, is not a referee. It is not the job of the psychologist to determine who is right or wrong or resolve a dispute by compromise. Conflict resolution is the technique used in mediation where an arbiter assists the couple to negotiate the terms of a settlement. A settlement is something that is acceptable when you are getting a divorce, not when you are planning to stay together. To settle and sacrifice your needs for the sake of the relationship can only lead to further resentment, conflict and contempt. It is counterproductive. To stick with the tennis analogy, couples counseling does not lead to “Love” just because the participants both agree to being “at fault.”

Taking sides in couples counseling is a big mistake. What is important in couples counseling is for the psychologist to assist both partners to develop the ego strength to see outside their own personal assumptions and begin to understand the perspective of the other and how it relates to the dynamics of the relationship. A seasoned therapist knows the focus in working with a couple must be on insight and transformation, not on who is right or wrong.

I help couples pinpoint and understand the sources of their conflicts. I will work with you to achieve a better understanding of the external influences and family dynamics that play a role in shaping your relationship and cause dysfunctional interactions. I will assist you in developing new strategies to solidify your relationship and regain trust and intimacy. The work will include learning how to openly communicate, problem solve and develop new productive ways to discuss, understand and accept individual differences.

The goal of couples therapy is to learn to see your significant other in a new light, based upon insight and knowledge and not the blind subconscious forces we sometimes mistake for attraction and love.
Dr. Martin Klein is a clinical psychologist who specializes in individual and couples psychotherapy. He has offices in Westport, Fairfield and Stamford. He is currently offering remote video conferencing.


Martin H is also listed in Best Marriage Therapists in Westport

Licensing & Certifications:

  • Licensed
  • License State: Connecticut
  • License Number: 001909, received 1987
  • clinical psychologist

Specialities:

  • Abuse & Trauma
  • ADHD
  • Alcohol Abuse
  • Anger Management
  • Anxiety
  • Behavioral Issues
  • Blended Families
  • Career Counseling
  • Child Therapy
  • Dating Coaching
  • Depression
  • Divorce
  • Family Conflict
  • Gender & sexual identity
  • Infidelity
  • Intimacy
  • Marital and Premarital
  • Panic Disorder
  • Self Esteem
  • Young Adult
  • Abuse

Types of Therapy:

Services Provided Via:

  • In person
  • Phone
  • Internet meeting

Works With:

  • Individual
  • Couples
  • Family
  • hypnotherapy

Working With Marriages for:

  • 25 Year(s)

Free Phone Consultations?

  • Yes

Hourly Fees Range:

  • $200 - $250

Accepts Insurance?

  • Yes

Language(s) Spoken:

  • English

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Office Location

64 Post Road West,
Westport ConnecticutUnited States 06880