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Do gay couples need counseling?

Answers (4)

LuckyInLove said on
If they're having issues communicating or anything else, just like any heterosexual couple (it is still a relationship regardless of the sex of the parties) yes, I would suggest that they get counseling. There is no law that says that they shouldn't. In fact they may need it more because of all the discrimination that they may have faced while being together.
BookLover4Life said on
I think if two people find themselves in trouble with their relationship then they should consider counseling as an option. I was once having some major difficulties with a long-term friend and even we considered going to counseling. I think it’s a helpful option for people if they are have access to it and are willing to put in the work.
MelissaMatters said on
Of course they do.  They are a couple, regardless of their sexual orientation or the sex of their partner.  I wouldn’t necessarily say that they deal with more problems than a heterosexual couple, but I would say that they probably also have different problems to add to that list.  Maybe more issues of society not always being accepted, or filling like a victim of some sort.  But in my experience, they also deal with the same type of issues that my heterosexual couples deal with they have families, infidelities, insecurities and money problems, just like anyone else.
PETTY34 said on
Same sex partnerships are not dissimilar from heterosexual partnerships, really.  However, gay couples tend to face a very different set of obstacles.  For example, gay couples wanting a family will need to consider the alternatives, adoption, surrogacy, or in-vitro fertilization.  The couples will need to have well-developed communication in order to lay out these complicated
plans.  They will need to have a clear agreement about the roles each partner will fill – who will sacrifice their career to care for a baby, how housework should be divided, and so on. They will also inevitably prepare to support one another in conflict, and dealing with discrimination from family members, or public entities. Gay couples invariably encounter social stigmas and convoluted bureaucracy which systematically impacts their ability to exercise certain rights or receive services.   For example, federal privacy laws may  prevent one from accessing her partner’s medical records, and she cannot sign on her partner’s behalf.  The red tape may affect a couple’s ability to apply for government aid, adopt children, sign as beneficiaries, or attain a
home loan.   Indeed, it is the social pressures and stratification brought to same sex couples in western society, which certainly create need for added support for couples leading alternative lifestyles.
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